• August 2011

    To understand the cultural significance of Steve Jobs, you have to go back in time: to before the iPad or iPhone or iTunes, before Apple Inc.’s comeback products made candy-colored plastics and iAnything cool, before Jobs got kicked out of Apple, even before the Macintosh hurled a sledgehammer at Big Brother. It’s 1981. Most people have never heard of Silicon Valley. The country’s most famous businessman is Lee Iacocca, the head of Chrysler Corp. He’s famous because in 1979 he engineered a government bailout -- loan guarantees -- that saved the company. He’s also famous because, unlike his peers, Iacocca is colorful. He seems to believe in what he’s doing.

  • August 2011

    People generally credit outgoing Apple CEO Steve Jobs (and partner engineer/inventor Steve Wozniak) and the Apple ][ for sparking the computer revolution. When commentators list the most influential people of all time, Steve Jobs is usually right on top. And often Microsoft CEO Bill Gates isn't even on the list. Why is that. One's vision built the platform for the other's. Here's how it really happened.

  • Four Seasons wins Silicon Challenge

    August 2011
  • August 2011

    Apple's "fifth Beatle," Ron Wayne, sold his 10% stake in the company two weeks after it was founded to avoid pushing paper and startup risks. That $35 billion would have been a lot of paper, Ron. I would have pushed.

  • August 2011

    If any one person can be said to have set off the personal computer revolution, it might be Steve Wozniak. He designed the machine that crystallized what a desktop computer was: the Apple II. Wozniak and Steve Jobs founded Apple Computer in 1976. Between Wozniak's technical ability and Jobs's mesmerizing energy, they were a powerful team. Woz first showed off his home-built computer, the Apple I, at Silicon Valley's Homebrew Computer Club in 1976. After Jobs landed a contract with the Byte Shop, a local computer store, for 100 pre-assembled machines, Apple was launched on a rapid ascent.

  • August 2011

    I get it. The fascination with Steve Jobs. The concern about whether Apple (AAPL) will remain a great and profitable company. It's big news -- the resignation of the man who introduced personal computing to the masses, saved Apple from its deathbed and left us all with a fantastic world of ways to communicate, entertain ourselves and even get some work done. You could scour the Earth for days to find someone that Apple hasn't touched -- as an investor, as a Macolyte, as an entrepreneur looking for a fabulously profitable business model, as an innovator looking for inspiration.

  • August 2011

    Steve Jobs today resigned as CEO of Apple. Jobs will continue on a Chairman of the Board, Apple reps confirmed to BYTE. Jobs, 55, cofounded Apple in 1975 with childhood friend and then aspiring inventor, Steve Wozniak. Jobs left Apple in 1984 after profound disagreements with its directors. Apple cycled through a series of blue chip CEOs, but the company's fortunes declined to dangerously low levels over time. By the late 1990s, many onlookers expected Apple to sell itself or go out of business. But in 1997, encouraged by friend, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, Jobs returned to the company. Entering as a temporary CEO, he stayed in place -- and presided over one of the most extraordinary company turnarounds in business history.

  • August 2011

    See Fusion-io Chief Scientist and Apple co-founder speak on Innovation in IT London, UK – 24th August 2011 – With just under two months left until the UK’s largest enterprise IT event, IP EXPO, takes place at London’s Earls Court 2, event organiser Imago Techmedia today proudly announced one of its keynote speakers will be Steve “the Woz” Wozniak, co-founder of Apple and Chief Scientist of Fusion-io, provider of a shared data decentralization platform. Wozniak will deliver his keynote, entitled “Today’s Science Fiction, Tomorrow’s Science Fact”, on October 20th alongside co-presenter Rick White, co-founder of Fusion-io. The keynote will present lessons in leadership, staying focused on goals, and how to champion innovation. If you’re ready to be a business hero, this talk will help you spread the inspiration that leads to progress and new possibilities in our information economy.

  • August 2011

    Apple said Mr. Jobs submitted his resignation to the board of directors on Wednesday and "strongly recommended" that the board name Mr. Cook as his successor. Mr. Jobs, 56 years old, has been elected chairman of the board and Mr. Cook will join the board, effective immediately, the company said.

  • August 2011

    "Steve's extraordinary vision and leadership saved Apple and guided it to its position as the world's most innovative and valuable technology company," said Art Levinson, chairman of Genentech, on behalf of Apple's board. "Steve has made countless contributions to Apple's success, and he has attracted and inspired Apple's immensely creative employees and world class executive team. In his new role as chairman of the board, Steve will continue to serve Apple with his unique insights, creativity and inspiration."