iMac

Can you donate me an iMac?

in
Question from E-mail

My name is Peter Jaramillo and I am a Computer teacher at an elementary school in Santa Rosa Ca, I have been trained as a PC specialist and software around the Wintel environment, I never touched an Apple until I got the job in January, well it turns out that I had a lot of studying to do! I bought some great books on Mac computers, the school has iMacs in the classroom. I dont have any money to buy an iMac and they have been nice enough to let me borrow one during Easter vacation, since summer vacation is here, I would very much like to have an iMac of my very own to learn as much as I can about the MAC OS. I would be very happy if you can donate me an iMac, if you cant I will understand. I am still youre fan!

Woz

Apple got a lot of respect in the education market and one major reason was a program long ago in which we gave a computer to every public school in California. Actually, the state passed a law that year that made this very inexpensive for us, so you can thank the taxpayers even more. But I, individually, have given so many computers to schools around the country that I can't keep doing it forever. It's like I'll run out, see? So, I'm glad that you want the iMac and I'm glad that you want to learn, but I'm not able to give you one.

You have to ask for such things sometimes, and it can pay off, so don't feel like not asking others. I remember once when Steve Jobs needed some money and he called Bill Hewlett (or Dave Packard) directly and asked for it. He didn't get the money, but they found a summer job for him.

What did you think of TotN

in
Question from E-mail

I share your great enthusiasm for the flexible iMac and concern with current quality issues. I leave you with two question: (1) Which one of you guys, in the very early days, supposedly typed machine code from memory to build an operating system over a few days time? (Myth or Fact) (2) No one has commented on the old documentary "Triumph of the Nerds", what did you think of this show from several years back? (It is a favorite of mine.)

Woz

I wrote all my code on paper in hexadecimal. I couldn't afford an assembler to translate my programs into hexadecimal bytes, I did it myself. Even my BASIC interpreter is all hand written. I'd type 4K into the Apple I and ][ in about an hour. I, and many others too I think, could sit down and start typing hexadecimal in for a SMALL program to solve something that occured or something that somebody else wanted. I'd do this all the time for demos. I certainly don't remember which hexadecimal codes are which 6502 instructions any longer, but it was a part of life back then.

I liked "Triumph of the Nerds." It was one of the best shows ever created of that kind. Everyone has the same opinion, so why ask me? I'm not a history expert and couldn't tell you what it missed or got wrong, but it seemed extremly thorough and insightful.

We were kings of our machines

in
Question from E-mail

I am writing this on a 20th Anniversary Mac (one of the "fire sale models" from the Apple Store) and it is a wonderful machine. I also have an iMac in my other farm office. But the IIe was still the most fun I ever had xomputing, and it kept the books just as good as these two machines do.

Woz

I love that 20th Anniversary Mac. I think of it as a perfect college machine, with the computer, TV, radio, CD player and more (AV even) all in one sleek machine. I don't know why, exactly, the ][e was so good to so many. I hear what you are saying all the time. I think that for a while, software was simple and we were kings of our machines. After the market was recognized as being very large, programs became immense. It became more of a contest to remember which menu something was in, than to do it yourself or make what program you had do the job you needed. It feels like the software is so good and immense now that it's often more important than we, the people, are. I didn't feel this way back in the early days. I can still feel that good now, but it's less often, like when I'm writing a program for fun.