Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Computer Inc. and a Silicon Valley icon, will speak at High Point University’s 2013 commencement. The ceremony is on Saturday, May 4 at 9 a.m. on Roberts Hall Lawn at the university.

The untold story behind Apple's $13,000 operating system CNET looks at newly surfaced contracts, design specs, and page after page of schematics and code, revealing how Apple created its first disk OS, a chapter of Silicon Valley history critical to its later success.

Steve Wozniak is no stranger to gaming, having met Steve Jobs while working at Atari and even programmed his own version of the classic video game, Pong. Did you know, though, that the Woz is a huge aficionado of the classic Gameboy game, Tetris. Well, he is… so much so that Nintendo Power magazine back in the 1980s refused to publish his scores anymore because he’d dominated the

Game Informer has a nifty little video of a recent meeting with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, who they ran into while in Montreal to cover the new Thief game. After bumping in to Wozniak, GI managed to convince him to do an interview. But the interview isn't the most interesting part of the story. Apparently Wozniak holds the high score in Nintendo Power magazine for Tetris on the original Game Boy. And he still has that Game Boy and his favorite game with him all the time.

Steve Wozniak (Woz) has been offering pearls of wisdom to students in America. His recommendation: students must find a purpose in their future careers in order to experience personal fulfillment.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) generates a ton of buzz, and that's an understatement. So, naturally, anytime we find an interview that's flying way under the radar, we've gotta share the details. This one comes courtesy of Florida International University's Hearst Lecture Series, found via YouTube. In the video, Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple, discusses "the future of apps and Siri" in particular.

Virtualization was invented in 1990, but it is still just beginning to realize its potential. Why? Because outdated storage architectures have held progress back. As Fusion-io Chief Scientist Steve Wozniak explains in this video, servers CPUs are becoming more powerful, but they can't get enough data to keep them busy.

Steve Wozniak, Speaking To The Denver Apple Pi Club In 1984, On College Pranks, Building The Apple I

AppleInsider was made aware of the video series by uploader Vince Patton, who said the footage comes from a VHS recording of a talk Wozniak gave on Oct. 4, 1984, to the Denver Apple Pi computer club. While the quality is not of the highest caliber, it is surprisingly watchable given its age.